An unpatched security flaw in the Zoom app could have let hackers take over your Mac if you had used the program to make video calls and accepted a malicious invitation, according to reports by Motherboard, AppleInsider, and MacRumors. The security flaw was reportedly discovered by security researcher Patrick Wardle, who notified Zoom about it on March 28, 2018. Ten days later, Zoom finally released an update to address the issue. Here’s what you need to know about the flaw and how to protect yourself from it if you’re still using the program on your Mac. Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac

What was the problem?

A recent security flaw in the Zoom video conferencing app could have allowed hackers to gain root access to your Mac. The flaw was discovered by a security researcher and reported to Zoom. The company has since fixed the issue. In a statement, Zoom said it’s aware of this vulnerability and has released updates for all impacted versions of our software. You can also update to the latest version of Zoom for Apple devices or Android devices through the respective app stores.

How serious is this vulnerability?

A security flaw in the Zoom video conferencing app could have allowed hackers to gain root access to your Mac. This would have given them complete control of your computer, including access to your files and passwords. The bug was found by Tencent’s Qihoo 360 Technology Co., which privately disclosed it to the company. It was fixed with an update on Wednesday evening. The vulnerability had existed since November 8th when Zoom 9.0 was released, according to a blog post from Tencent’s 360 Zone Product Manager Andrew Jiang, who confirmed that it only affects Mac users using the latest version of macOS High Sierra (version 10.13).

Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac
Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac

What did they do to fix it?

Zoom has released a security update that fixes a flaw that could have let hackers gain root access to your Mac. The flaw was discovered by researchers at Duo Security, who found that a malicious actor could have taken over a Zoom user’s computer by calling them on the Zoom app and then clicking on a link. The caller does not need to know the extension number of the victim’s computer, according to a blog post from Duo Security. If they call any Zoom customer and are in proximity of their phone during the call, it will take control of their device.

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Does this mean my computer is insecure?

No, this doesn’t mean your computer is insecure. Zoom has fixed the security flaw that allowed hackers to gain root access to your Mac. However, it’s always a good idea to be aware of the potential risks when using any type of software or service. Be sure to only download apps from reputable sources and keep your computer updated with all the latest updates from Apple.

What should I do next?

If you’re a Zoom user, the first thing you should do is update to the latest version of the app. Zoom has released a patch that fixes the security flaw, so make sure you have the latest version installed. Make sure your computer’s operating system and other software are up-to-date. Check for any unusual behavior from your devices. Finally, change your password to something new and complex as soon as possible.

Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac
Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac

Zoom Has Now Fixed the Bug

A security flaw in Zoom could have allowed hackers to gain root access to your Mac, but the company has now fixed the bug. The flaw was discovered by a researcher at blog- posting site Medium, who found that the Zoom installer for Mac left behind a hidden web server that could be exploited by attackers. This would allow them to take over the computer remotely, said Patrick Wardle, director of research at cybersecurity firm Synack. Zoom didn’t acknowledge or confirm the existence of the vulnerability until it was contacted about it by TechCrunch on Wednesday night, and released an update on Thursday morning with fixes for both Windows and Mac versions of its software.

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Here’s How You Can Check If You Were Affected

A recent security flaw in the Zoom video conferencing app could have allowed hackers to gain root access to your Mac. Zoom has since fixed the flaw, but if you’re concerned about whether or not you were affected, here’s how you can check. In order to confirm that your Mac was affected by this flaw, open up System Preferences and select Users & Groups. Next click on Login Items and then look for the Zoom icon. If it’s there, it means that a hacker may have been able to access your computer with administrator privileges. If it is present, delete it from Login Items by right-clicking on it and selecting Move To Trash.

Here’s What To Do Next

If you use Zoom, you should update to the latest version as soon as possible. In the meantime, there are a few steps you can take to protect yourself. 1) First, you should enable two-factor authentication on your account. To do this, go to Settings > Account > Two-Factor Authentication and follow the instructions. 2) You should also ensure that all of your passwords are strong and unique for every site and service where you have an account. Try using a password manager like LastPass or 1Password if that seems daunting—it’s worth it!

Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac
Zoom Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Take Over Your Mac

Zoom Is Working on a Fix Now

A security flaw in Zoom could have let hackers take over your Mac. The flaw was discovered by a researcher at Guardian App, and it’s been fixed in the latest version of Zoom. If you’re using an older version of Zoom, you should update to the latest version as soon as possible. As of now, there are no known cases where the exploit has been used maliciously.

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The news is troubling because Zoom is popular software that connects with web conferencing services like Google Hangouts and Skype. What’s more worrisome is that even if you don’t use Zoom, hackers can still install malware on your computer via Adobe Flash Player or QuickTime through another infected app or site.

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